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Guatemala 2009

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A cleft palate is a cleft palate.

But the patients are always different.

They come from different towns with different stories and different faces. And that is why each trip to the same city, Antigua, is different – but just as rewarding as the last.

On August 15, 2009, a Surgicorps team of 47 volunteers (25 on their first mission) from Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Florida, Colorado, Utah, Boston, Connecticut and California met in Guatemala for a week-long mission of surgeries and related medical care. Same hospital, same host staff – different patients, different lives to be impacted.

Seven days and 86 surgeries later, the team returned to the United States, and Surgicorps International added 86 names to the list of thousands whose lives have been improved in Central and South America, Africa, and Asia over the past 15 years.

Doctors, nurses, medical students, non-medical volunteers, all working daily in some large or small role to achieve the same goal: an improved life for someone in need. All working daily to feel what one volunteer, 16-year old Aarthi Ramesh, felt after working with her mother, an anesthesiologist, and her father, a general surgeon: “This might have been the best day of my life.”

Luncheon with Royal Family

During its April Medical Mission trip to Paro, Bhutan, the team was received by His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo and Their Majesties the Queen Mothers for a special luncheon in Dechencholing Palace in Thimphu. His Majesty expressed his appreciation to Surgicorps International for the good work they did through these camps in many different parts of the developing world in general and the work they are doing in Bhutan in particular.

Surgicorps Team was received by His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo and Their Majesties the Queen Mothers for a special luncheon in Dechencholing Palace in Thimphu.

This was a great honor for the Surgicorps Team – much like meeting the President of the United States. To add to the excitement, team members donned the traditional clothing of a gho for the men and a kira for the women. After a week of scrubs, it was fun to see everyone dressed-up. After meeting the Royal Family, we better understand why they are so well loved by their people, and we were impressed by their graciousness.

Also attending the luncheon was Lyonpo Zangley Drukpa, the Minister for Health and Dr. Gado Tshering, Secretary, Ministry of Health.

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